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W̶h̶a̶t̶ ̶I̶'̶m̶ ̶l̶i̶s̶t̶e̶n̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶t̶o̶:
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"All Things Good - A Musical Tour"

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"Love Songs for the Singularity"

26th August 2014

Quote reblogged from WIL WHEATON dot TUMBLR with 1,349 notes

A coroner’s report obtained exclusively by NBC News directly contradicts the police version of how a 22-year-old black man died in the back seat of a Louisiana police cruiser earlier this year — but still says the man, whose hands were cuffed behind his back, shot himself.
 
In a press release issued March 3, the day he died, the Louisiana State Police said Victor White III apparently shot himself in an Iberia Parish police car. According to the police statement, White had his hands cuffed behind his back when he shot himself in the back.
 
But according to the full final report of the Iberia Parish coroner, which was released nearly six months later and obtained exclusively by NBC News, White was shot in the front, not the back. The bullet entered his right chest and exited under his left armpit. White was left-handed, according to family members. According to the report, the forensic pathologist found gunshot residue in the wound, but not the sort of stippling that a close-range shot can sometimes produce. He also found abrasions on White’s face.
 
And yet, despite the contradictions – and even though White’s hands were never tested for gunpowder residue – the Iberia Parish coroner still supported the central contention of the initial police statement issued back in March. Dr. Carl Ditch ruled that White shot himself, and declared his death a suicide.

26th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Caterpillars and Cream with 7,654 notes

4gifs:

Otter what are you doing the table is for people. [video]

4gifs:

Otter what are you doing the table is for people. [video]

Source: ForGIFs.com

26th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Twitter: The Comic with 2,111 notes

twitterthecomic:

"Look, son! I built a time machine!"
Dad, you just put some glow sticks on the minivan.
*dad pulls a gun*
"Get in the fucking time machine."— Big Money Rowlf (@iRowlf) May 10, 2013

twitterthecomic:

26th August 2014

Link reblogged from Field Notes of a Cosmic Anthropologist with 3 notes

Ancient Arabian Stones Hint at How Humans Migrated Out of Africa →

m1k3y:

Previous research had suggested that the exodus from Africa started between 70,000 and 40,000 years ago. However, a genetic analysis reported in April hinted that modern humans might have begun their march across the globe as early as 130,000 years ago, and continued their expansion out of Africa in multiple waves.
In addition, stone artifacts recently unearthed in the Arabian Desert date to at least 100,000 years ago. This could be evidence of an early modern-human exodus out of Africa, scientists say. However, it’s possible that these artifacts weren’t created by modern humans; a number of now-extinct human lineages existed outside Africa before or at the same time when modern humans migrated there. For instance, the Neanderthals, the closest known extinct relatives of modern humans, lived in both Europe and Asia around that time.

To help shed light on the role the Arabian Peninsula might have played in the history of modern humans, scientists compared stone artifacts recently excavated from three sites in the Jubbah lake basin in northern Saudi Arabia with items from northeast Africa excavated in the 1960s. Both sets of artifacts were 70,000 to 125,000 years old. Back then, the areas that are now the Arabian and Sahara deserts were far more hospitable places to live than they are now, which could have made it easier for modern humans and related lineages to migrate out of Africa.

"Far from being a desert, the Arabian Peninsula between 130,000 and 75,000 years ago was a patchwork of grasslands and savanna environments, featuring extensive river networks running through the interior," Scerri said.

The northeast African stone tools the researchers analyzed were similar to ones previously found near modern-human skeletons. The scientists found that stone artifacts at two of the three Arabian sites were “extremely similar” to the northeast African stone tools, Scerri told Live Science. At the very least, Scerri said, this finding suggests that there was some level of interaction between the groups in Africa and those in the Arabian Peninsula, and might hint that these Arabian tools were made by modern humans.

Surprisingly, Scerri said, tools from the third Arabian site the researchers analyzed were “completely different.” “This shows that there was a number of different tool-making traditions in northern Arabia during this time, often in very close proximity to each other,” she said.

One possible explanation for these differences is that the artifacts were made by different human lineages. Future research needs to uncover skeletal remains with ancient tools unearthed from the Arabian Peninsula to help solve this mystery, Scerri noted. Unless skeletal remains are found near such artifacts, it will remain uncertain whether modern humans or a different  human lineage might have made them.

"It seems likely that there were multiple dispersals into the Arabian Peninsula from Africa, some possibly very early in the history of Homo sapiens," Scerri said. "It also seems likely that there may have been multiple dispersals into this region from other parts of Eurasia. These features are what make the Arabian Peninsula so interesting."

Ancient migrants out of Africa and from Eurasia might have encountered a number of different populations in the Arabian Peninsula, Scerri said. Some of these groups may have adapted to their environment more than others had, which raises the intriguing question:

"Did the exchange of genes and knowledge between such groups contribute to our ultimate success as a species?" Scerri said.

26th August 2014

Post reblogged from I'll tumblr for ya with 72 notes

coelasquid:

I grew up playing bizarre Mac games no one has ever heard of. I don’t even remember most of their names so I’ve never heard of them either. They are lost to the ages.

There was a game called Space Station Pheta on the old family Mac when I was little that I would go to great lengths to play again

26th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Art Against Society with 914 notes

artagainstsociety:

paperpanther:

Here’s a portrait of H.P. Lovecraft by PP’s Eimhin for our frequent musical collaborator and fellow strange fiction aficionado Chris M.

Chris has been putting up lots of great atmospheric sound tracks on his Unity Assets store recently: LINK

eek! love it!

Source: paperpanther

26th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Unentitled with 255,047 notes

Source: frenums

26th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Unentitled with 79,323 notes

You have such a huge fan base and it’s such an interesting show. Do your fans ask you for anything unusual? It being such an unusual show.

Source: fionagoddess

26th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Horror Whore with 552 notes

coitusandcarnage:

Creature from the Black Lagoon


caterpillars-and-cream

coitusandcarnage:

Creature from the Black Lagoon

caterpillars-and-cream

Tagged: date night

Source: coitusandcarnage

26th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Laughing Squid on Tumblr with 363 notes

laughingsquid:

Acorns, An App for Easily Investing Spare Change Into a Diversified Portfolio

laughingsquid:

Acorns, An App for Easily Investing Spare Change Into a Diversified Portfolio